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Chris Morgan

Chris Morgan believes that an Arts-based education that enhances both lifestyle and employment prospects should be a fundamental human right for everyone. Following 32 years dedicated to teaching visual arts, Morgan has turned his focus to progressing his own academic development by attaining master’s degrees in Contemporary Arts, and in Fine Art.

Along with his graduate shows, Morgan’s works have been exhibited on three occasions at Launceston’s Sawtooth Gallery, at Launceston Church Grammar School’s Poimena Gallery and at Launceston College’s The Gallows Gallery. He has featured as a finalist in several awards within Tasmania and beyond and has presented academic papers to international conferences in Tasmania, New South Wales, and Portugal.

Morgan continues to refine his technique with experimentation and research in order to develop a body of work of high photographic value that reflects the natural flows and natural formations of the Tasmanian landscape.

Chris Morgan

I make images that explore places through the creation of a photographic based sense of time. My interests lie in developing some alignment between mythology and things that are structural – of what is concertinaed and mixed-up in the landscape over time by natural forces, and the patterns, lines and shapes that emerge for storytelling based around this rearrangement of the landscape.

Over the past five years, and since completing a Masters of Fine Art, I have spent much time in the Tarkine area of Tasmania – more specifically travelling along the Pieman River between the settlement of Corinna and the Coast. This area of the Pieman River contains a buried history that is often spoken of in conversations as boats ply the river. Although some evidence exists of prior enterprise and human habitation, both recent and ancient – many stories of the Pieman have fallen into the area of myth or the stories remain untold.

My endeavour therefore is to bring this section of the river to life – to draw attention in an ideological sense to a need for awareness around human involvement in this wilderness, and in the conservation and the preservation of the area.