Fiona Lee

Fiona Lee is an artist with an interest in dialogical, pedagogical modes of social practice, and the role of the artist-curator. She curated Our Day will Come, an alternative art school by Paul O’Neill (2011) for Contemporary Art Spaces Tasmania (CAST), and co-curated with Pat Brassington, The Arresting Image (2009) for the Plimsoll Gallery. In addition to her artistic practice, for the past 15 years she has been involved in exhibition curating and touring, and gallery administration—at CAST 2004-09; as a member of the Plimsoll Committee 2001- 2010; as a Board member of INFLIGHT art (2010-2011), and in 2009, she worked for the Australia Council at the 53rd Venice Biennale. She has had a residency at the Cité Internationale des Arts in Paris and two Australia Council Funded art residencies in the UK. She has been awarded an APA scholarship for post-graduate studies and the Marie Edwards Travelling Scholarship.

All artworks

Women of IXL:  These artworks were created by Fiona whilst completing her Masters at The Univercity of Tasmania’s School of Creative Arts.  Herself and a group of other students were invited to explore the derelict building of the IXL jam factory before it underwent the transformation into The Henry Jones Art Hotel.    They then created a series of art based on what they found.  Fiona discovered some beautiful old wallpaper hidden amongst the detritus in the building.  It stood out as a particularly feminine object compared to the masculine machinery left behind.  This led Fiona to imagine the women working in this factory and she created artworks in honour of them.

Iron:  In this series Fiona reflects on her connection to the convicts that built Tasmania.  Fiona grew up in a beautiful old house which she remembers having a gorgeous wrought iron balcony at the front.  She later discovered that the wrought iron as well as parts of her home were made by the convicts that came to Tasmania in the early 1800’s, just like The Henry Jones Art Hotel.  Not only this, but Fiona discovered that she herself comes from hardy convict heritage, as do many proud Tasmanians.