Paul Snell

Paul Snell, born in 1968, lives and works in Launceston, Tasmania. His photographic works demonstrate the expansion of the creative potential of digital image making and speak of photography’s transition from object to pure information.

Paul’s work is formal and self-referential in its intentions; colour is the fundamental ingredient and its vibrancy is maximised by form. The absence of signs or objects create a physical, mental and sensorial experience and invites the viewer to drift among primal and tonal aesthetic matter. It immerses the viewer in colour, rhythm and space, creating a sensory experience of inner contemplation and transcendence.

Paul has been working as an artist and teacher for the past 20 years. He has exhibited widely in numerous solo and group exhibitions and his work is held in private and public collections nationally.

Paull has been a finalist in many National Prizes including The Blake Prize (2011), The Geelong Print Prize (2011), The Prometheus Art Award (2011) and The Sunshine Coast Art Prize (2011). In 2012 he won the nationally recognised Tidal Art Prize.

All Artworks

These digital photographic works demonstrate the expansion of the creative potential of digital image making. The works speak of photography’s transition from object to pure information. Through the re-structuring, removing and refining of data I have sought to throw off the shackles of conventional representation. The work is purely formal and self-referential in its intentions; colour is the fundamental ingredient and its vibrancy is maximised by form.

The reductive nature of these pieces examines and brings into question the image as self-referential object. The work seeks a dialogue in the sense of perceiving and using visual levels of perception to create a physical, mental and sensorial experience. The absence of signs or objects invites the viewer to drift among primal and tonal aesthetic matter. The aim has been to immerse the viewer in colour, rhythm and space, creating a sensory experience of inner contemplation and transcendence.

The pause, the gap and the omission are increasingly significant in our saturated image driven society. Through this body of work the daily saturation is replaced by selective sensitisation, the sharpening of individual senses; these pieces invite concentration, quiet and even silence. By rhythmically repeating, pairing, overlapping, reversing and sequencing and through the investigations of specific colour relationships, I seek a sensory understanding of the physical object. The primary intention of this body of non-objective work is to create a visual experience, utilizing the basic elements of line, colour, surface and light.

This body of work involves furthering the concepts of reduction (of form, space, line and material) and the effect of colour as visual signature. By developing these concepts I am inviting the viewer into the space for a contemplative experience with the work.